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Monthly Archives: May 2009

My little convertible Pony turned 130k this time out: still getting around 30mpg at highway speeds over the Continental Divide, canyons, and stopping fast for deer.
I passed an old pickup on
a long uphill who had blown by me at over 90mph back on the flats- as I crested the
hill my cruise control always takes a sec to realize we are going
downhill and my speed floats up a bit- so I was now coasting at close
to <.!.> when suddenly there were deer in the road just a few seconds
ahead. I looked behind to see what I expected, the truck had crested
the hill and thought we were racing (when actually my speed had been a
constant speed set just below what MT State Patrol consider too fast- the hill had slowed the truck down to a labored 65 or so, but now he was wide open pointed downhill). I-15 is a wide two lane tarmac with a tall concrete barrier on the left that the deer
couldn’t cross. I was still in the left lane from passing the truck
(and lining myself up to straighten out the upcoming corner) I sucked
in as close to the inside rumble strip as I could, straightened her out
and hit the breaks- the ABS kicked in and with no steering pull or even a shimmy from the car I was at a full stop
quicker than I thought possible with a big eyed deer peeling out and falling down a
few feet from my bumper. I had been sure I would eat at least
one of the deer, and my bigger concern was the pickup coming up fast
behind me- if he turned his wheel he would flip and sweep me and the
deer from the road. The other few deer stopped short as I had
suddenly materialized in the middle of them, and the truck blasted
between them without having to blink. I sat idling on the highway,
knowing there was no one else coming up from behind, while the deer
finally got its skating hooves under itself and they all turned and
bounced into the forest.

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Drove up to the Ranch this weekend to move the herd from Dave Anderson’s “lowland” ranch up to Alpine Meadows- about 15 miles on horseback: a long way for the new little calves. There was three feet of snow up here just a week earlier, and snow squalls and rain since-  the grass has barely started.
 

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Foundry day. All the fish cast out clean and were reassembled nicely. Today’s job was to position them to school through the hoops. Each fish needs at least two points of contact, either with the hoop or with another fish. After a few hours of tack-welding, snapping the weld and adjusting, re welding, and fussing about- they came together into two nice groupings. A group of three swimming tightly together through a descending rapid, and a group of two swimming level and further apart. The lead fish is slightly buoyant- as if rising toward the surface, to contrast with the prior commission further down the road where the lead fish is diving toward a “splash” on the ground alluding to river diverted underground.

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