The arts may collapse, but a good weld is a good weld.

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The trailer can fit two shipping containers. It is a beast.

A buddy of mine has started a business as a trucker; his rig is a stout MAC tractor and this flatbed trailer. He lives up a steep winding road in Park City, and a neighbor lets him park the flatbed down at the bottom at a vacant lot. The underside railing of the trailer needed to be cut out and replaced. The outfit is too big turn on a city street, so we couldn’t use my shop. He picked up a nice little welder that would run on 110, but provide 140amps, and we lifted his big generator into the back of his truck and worked in-situ, or en-plein-air if we really want to be artsy about it.

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There are six tubes that span the underside, aligning with “flying buttresses” of pipe that support the width of the bed. Here I have replaced 3. It took all day.

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The prior owner of the trailer had covered five of the six rail pipe in carpet to stow things below. The pipes were severely corroded, and many of the welds had sheared. This would get his operation shut down at any inspection point. We cut out all the old pipe, all but the last pipe way down by the wheels as it hadn’t been carpeted and was fine. The inside diameter of the new pipe is bigger than the outside diameter of the old pipe- nice upgrade.

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Small shielded welding wire on a little welder hooked up to a generator that would pop its circuit if I made any mistake, coupled with gusty wind, made for tough welding conditions. The original pipes were all cut short to ensure their fit, then steel disks were welded on each sidewall of the big beams to gap in the pipe, and the pipes were welded to the disks. I ground out the pipe-weld, and re-welded to the big circular platforms. This took a lot of grinding… my birthday present Cestus gloves with long cuffs were essential. My xmas present of a Home Depot card had Santa’d my burly 10amp Bosch grinder with vibration dampening, which proved up nicely. 

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I returned the next morning and had it all finished by 11am. Each run of pipe is just under four feet long. This should be noticeably smoother under load.

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Fitting the tubing was the technical part. We cut the tubes a bit long, then I ground out the old welds on the giant I-Beams, then cut and ground down an end until the pipe was just just too long to fit. Then I whanged it into place with the sledgehammer (visible btwn the 2nd and 3rd rail). This assures that I’m putting structure back to the buttressing pipe and supporting the platform above, rather than the weld pulling against the sidewall, which would also increase the likelihood of the weld shearing under load stress.

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