Foiled!

dsc09098

I turned the house into a giant jiffy-pop. (movie reference alert: Real Genius)

Spreading industrial grade perforated aluminum over the top of the blown-in-insulation has been on my radar for a few years. It is primarily an upgrade for blocking summer heat radiating through the roof: mitigating about 97% of the radiant attic heat. In warmer climates the foil is attached to the rafters, and has little pinholes to allow convection to move the hot air up to the roof peak. The foil I used is made to be laid flat in hot/cold climates; it has larger punched perforations allowing moisture/condensation to pass through. Laying it atop the lofted insulation stops the cold air from pressing down and sinking through. Cold always drives downward, and the house heat meets the down-driving cold and creates a fast convection circuit that rips heat out of the house. With the diving force of the cold air blocked, the house should be cozier. Mostly though, it is for our triple-digit summers.

I pre-cut sections of foil out on the deck, then used a 10 foot run of pvc with a nail taped to an end to pierce the foil and push it into place. Before pushing it I added upright tabs of aluminum heat-tape, and after pushing it into place, used another pvc run with a T ending to press the tape down onto the adjoining section of foil cover. It went pretty well, but standing on a little board by the hole for the ladder in a slippery tyvec suit and finding physical leverage to make things go where they needed was a bit like doing yoga-for four hours.

dsc09099

dsc09101

The giant exhaust fan (Whole-House cooling for summer) was mostly snugged with foil. I figured that I couldn’t fenagle a 3×3 foot foil section to cover the spot behind the vertical board, or I may have just been tired out and given up…

dsc09102

I could just reach the far corner if I linked two 10 foot sections of pipe. The pipe then becomes drunken and floppy way out at the end, and the foil slides off the pushing nail and won’t allow the nail to re-pierce and gets belligerent about moving at all.

dsc09104

Years ago I built this foam air-lock to cap the attic ladder. I added it after I had hired an outfit to blow insulation to an R-whatever on top of the here-and-there sections of fiberglass batting already in place from the previous home-owner. (bcs I just can’t stop tinkering)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s