Invisible Frontier Upgrade

If only our human invisible frontiers of immunity could be upgraded.

Summer remnant Quail eggs under the Iris out front.

Last fall the truck gained Michelin All Terrain tires. They are great off-road monsters, incredibly sticky in snow and mud, and on dirt roads throw stones against the truck like spinning sandblasters. After 3 months at the ranch with these tires (since our spring earthquake & coviding), the truck needed some preventative intervention. I ordered $25 bucks worth of 3M Scotchgard 8mil clear-shield and a felted squeegee kit to try out; it is the same polymer sheeting as “clear-bra” put on the noses of cars to protect the paint from highway dings, but in bigger sizes and longer runs. It went on easily enough and stayed on through the season’s first super-slush snow-driving, so I ordered enough to run around the truck’s ding-zone and waited for nice weather to return. 60-70 degree temps for the past two days saw it all go in place.

From a distance, the clear-coat is invisible.
The rear driver’s side- starts behind the wheel fender with the top-line aligning with the brake light and wraps just around the curve. I used 12″ here to capture the entire zone.
It is a subtle line running the entire length; 6″ height from the bottom of the door up, and a narrower strip coming from under the truck to the line of the door.
It wraps just around the edges between the cab and the bed.
4″nearly captures all the body as it wraps under. The blackened frame is a project from 2018, I just touched it up a few weekends ago.
Passenger rear panel: Montana pebble sandblast should be mostly solved as the 12″ clear-shield lifts to the bottom of the brake light. The black bumper was a project from 2018, and I touched it up when doing the undercarriage as it had rock dings as well.
The clear-coat tucks behind the rear wheel fender and ends just in front of the rear bumper.
6″ tall from door bottom up, passenger side.
I started the whole process with the passenger side, and cut the door piece too short which is why it only partially matches the front edge of the door. Oh well.
From a step away it disappears, and is guarded by the front tire fender.
Driver’s side again, the final panel; for seeing the learning curve, because you can’t see it.

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