Archive

Park City Cut

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The trout came home last Friday in three pieces and waited out the blustery snow splattered weekend. Today’s shop session brought the long stainless steel rod into the head section of the fish, passing through the belly and welded top and bottom for stability. I worked quickly as I could go, as the welder is nearly out of gas- and surprised myself by getting it all together before the tank ran out. I either drank too much coffee before starting out, or it was from grinding the seams and sprews- but my hands were a bit shaky for the last bit of welding. After the months of “carpenter’s elbow” in both arms from finishing out the Herriman Mobile, I decided I would call it a day.

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Private commission production! A single trout is being privately commissioned from my pre-existing mold. The molds had gotten a little dusty- the image with both sides of the mold show a contrast of washed and unwashed. I want the trout to be moving his tail, so each half of the mold must be done separately, then joined together. To get the movement in the mold I slump it over a bent sheet of metal for one half, then flip the metal and place the opposite side of the mold on the mirror curve. Wax is applied with a paint brush til thick enough, which takes awhile.

Once the two sides are painted in, they must be joined together. Flexing the mold for the movement of the fish compresses one side and extends the other- the gap in the side of the fish illustrates just how much movement has been added as I have to cut one side in half to match the head and tail. To fill the little gap I created a section of the fish to fit and seamed it into place. Next I’ll heat up the tail and give it a bit more flex, then add on all the fins. Once it is all together I’ll tweak the seams, add a few new spots, then it will be time to swim on down to the foundry.