Archive

sculpture

 

This morning the Ibis built its nest site out at the new Great Salt Lake Nature Center at Farmington Bay with a little help from my friend Jed and I.  Elizabeth imagines it must be quite a shock for the little guy after spending the past five and half months puttering around in the studio.

Under his feet I welded in large stainless steel anchor posts that rest on stainless steel angle stock (shown in December post). This stainless steel footing is immersed in a concrete footing.  A concrete filled posthole reinforced with rebar drops below the concrete form box, adding thousands of pounds of strength to the structure ( the post hole digger is in the image at the left). The angled boards brace the sculpture while the concrete cures. I will return on Wednesday and remove the bracing and form-box, affix the turn-wheel, take the protective wrapping off the legs, replace the stones under and around the feet, and give him a final wax & polish.

 

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Floodgate Closed.

Ready for New Years’ Eve now that the Ibis is complete. Patina went well and he is a nicely layered French Brown toning from reds to golds to chocolate. He wandered around the yard and I took pictures as he explored.

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Floodgate Open.

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“Back” side.

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Twinkle in his eye.

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Skinny front view.

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Waterfall Floodgate; would be a perfect addition to the yard.

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A heart of falling water.

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Wings folded along his back.

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Strolling about.

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Nesting area?

Ibis Floodgate

Ibis Floodgate!

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Stainless Steel Waterman Floodgate.

The floodgate for the Ibis is a Waterman C10 in Stainless Steel and cast iron. Tweak #1 was cutting it shorter. Tweak #2 (after complete disassembly) was repainting the 5 cast iron parts. Tweak #3 was grinding all the Stainless to a clean surface, then cutting the threaded SS lift rod and cleaning it’s nose and end. Then reassemble. I ordered bronze square tubing from Denver that is waiting out in the studio for the next step: cutting it to fit and welding it to the stainless (also welding all the stainless parts together and tack-welding all the bolts). Eventually the bronze Ibis head and legs will weld on as well.

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Gate sized down and refitted.
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Nora stands in for scale.

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SS ground clean and cast iron parts repainted.

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Lift rod cut to size too.

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A chilly day in the shop with Orange Air Quality (pm2 @ 141, nearly Red).

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View from the sidewalk on Wilmington.

Installation day started off raining and chilly, just how the fish like it. With two handy fellows helping (Jed, who helped install the last group, and Mike) things got started at 8am and finished by 3pm with time off for lunch at one of the restaurants on the plaza. A solid day of digging and lifting heavy things, but all are in the ground and everyone is happy.

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Swimming alongside the concrete current.

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Follow their lead to the next fish.

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Enter the plaza and these singles stairstep up the planter beds.

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Lower single swimmer.

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Upper single swimmer.

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The pair take a bead on you as you leave the plaza.

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The swim around the base of a tall tower.

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The fish like their new digs.

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Out on the big plaza, bridging the Hidden Hollow trail on Parley’s Creek.

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Parley’s Creek is just past the sunny bit of lawn at the top of the image.

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They swim just within the boundary of the plaza.

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Heading toward the curved public bench.

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Linking the curvy landscaping to the riparian trail.

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The blue concrete connects the pair to the singles under the tower.

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The plaza is so big, the fish become invisible from the far end; good thing there are fish at this end too.

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Thursday. Pair One.

Chemlab for fishies. The fish enter the sandblast tent and are stripped of all contaminants and oxidation. With the surface sand-scoured, all imperfections show up and I put in some last fidgets with welding and chasing- then back in the tent for a follow up visit from Dr.Sanders. The surface glows a muted gold, but is as vulnerable to the air as a ginger to the high desert sun. Like a base-tan with sunscreen, they need a chemical etching that bites into the bronze then goes inert allowing a skin of protection. The fish go black with this initial etching layer, but it allows other chemicals to safely react to the surface and bring out other colors. The fish will go blue-green (Cupric Nitrate and Zinc Nitrate) with hints of dun yellow and yellow-green (a few drops of Ferric in the solution), while the hoops will turn a rich brown with white in all the recesses.

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Sandblast. Weld / Chase. Sandblast.

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Layer One: basecoat etching sprayed on.

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Layer One: Rinse.

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Layer One: dry / set with heat.

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Two single fish, a welder, and a plastic enclosure hiding a sandblaster. Oh dear.

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Layer One: scrub back to chocolate.

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Etched and toned and ready for color.

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Cupric / Zinc Nitrate brings on the color.

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Friday’s fish is already done, this is Saturday’s fish.

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Saturday: single fish #2

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Hooking on for the next round of Cupric to green out the middle.

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Single #2 has Ferric added in for surprise areas of y/g.

Patina builds up with chemicals and heat, layer after layer. Control of the process is partly knowing when you haven’t gotten there yet with knowing when to stop, all the while blending out areas that come on too fast and bringing up areas that seem to never get there. There is quite a bit of alchemy to it, as it is a mad science.

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Sunday Duo: out of sandblast.

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swimming around the driveway

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Sandblast. Weld / Chase. Sandblast. is how the morning went

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Expand into your golden hours…

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… soon they live only in memory.

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Etching layer squirt.

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Blackened, rinsed and heated. too hot out for the next bit.

I cleared the only chem shop in the valley of their Cupric Nitrate, a trace of 100g- or about not enough for one fish. They ordered more, it should have been in last Thurs/Fri, it wasn’t. I’ve used my reserve stash for the first 4, and have just the 100g left for this last pair which will never make it. The fish will have to set overnight and see if the order arrives tomorrow- not a hardship on the human to wait as temps peaked out at 98 degrees.

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Sunday’s Poled Pair

One pair grew poles today, and the last pair will sprout poles tomorrow. It takes a few fish biscuits to get the pair to fly sideways and perfectly level to the ground, plus two hoists and the forgotten magics of the Masons for establishing level as vertical as horizontal as plumb. Once the last pair has legs, then everyone gets a last once-over for fine tuning; then the shop is flipped over for sandblast and patina.

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Swim team.

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Stanley brings E along for the inspection.