Aero-Front Frontier

An aerodynamic front end on a truck isn’t a concern for manufacturers because the back end of the truck is a giant brick that drags backward in destabilizing alternating vortices. The design response on new trucks is a massive square and flat front end that pushes a giant wall of air much larger than the truck itself, utilizing the width and length of the truck to overcome stability issues for the rear end. The Tesla Cybertruck is the only truck that created an aero solution to the rear of the truck, and so also has an aero front end- a front end that augments the solution of the rear. My previous mods stabilized the vehicle at high speed, and increased mileage by an average of 50%, but didn’t address airflow from the front bumper to the windshield.

New aeromod concept: 30″ x 7″ platform with seven airtabs on front Shrockworks bumper.
The airtabs create rooster-tails of entrained vortices that rise 3 to 4 times the height of the tab- so about as high as the floodlights and angling back/up to soften the bumper’s tube risers and the flow over the hood. The black tabs at R are from the prior mod, and stabilize air at the front wheel wells/ tires.
The tabs are just behind a run of pipe- the round edge rolls the air to the tab, rather than leading with a hard thin edge. The underside of the pipe rolls air under and stalls it below. This is an important pressure variant for front end stability.
The multiple wedges below the platform are for more than structure, they also structure the ramming/stalling air and stabilize the dead air pushing in front of the bumper. The platform without the tabs is a small wing, with the tabs it is little engine of airflow. The five black tabs under the truck are from the prior aeromod, and structure the “dirty air” below.
Cardboard mockup.
I had thought I’d use the D-Ring holes, but decided keep those clear for the D-Ring instead.
I’d thought a wedge would be best, then reconsidered the air stall v lift and went with a modified wing to increase the airflow stability on the airtabs.

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